Bone Broth 101 + recipe round

Warning: this post contains images of raw animal bones that might offend some. The purpose of this post is to inform people about all aspects of bone broth; it isn’t intended to offend people.

The highly revered, much spoken about liquid gold that is so celebrated in the paleo and primal world. Sooner or later on your paleo journey, you’ll find yourself comfortable and secure with the lifestyle and dietary changes you’ve made, and ready for the next step. You’ll find yourself ready (and willing) to take on the task of making your own bone broth. This was how I felt.

I knew that bone broth was good for you and could be incredibly useful in both one’s cooking arsenal and gut health, and so I took the leap and started making my own bone broth about nine months into paleo. Only, it wasn’t such a big and complicated step as I had expected and had built up in my head: it was actually incredibly simple. All I needed was the right equipment (which I had), and the right ingredients (which were easily bought, even in my neck of rural Scotland). Something that seemed so intricate and complicated, like something out of the kitchen of a Parisian, 5-star restaurant, was actually very easy and practical to make. So easy, it can literally be thrown together in 10 minutes.

Continue reading

Advertisements

An in-depth look at stress (via Primal Eye)

Grab yourself a cup of tea (or bulletproof coffee), make yourself comfortable and have a read through my in-depth post on stress below.

20160502_160731 (3)

A topic that I’ve written about extensively over at Primal Eye magazine is one that is very close to me, one that I’ve been experiencing all too well lately: stress. I’ve mentioned this several times in previous posts, but it’s worth stressing again: 2015 was a huge year for me, for us, and it was so busy. We bought our first home, and the week before we were due to move, I went home to Winnipeg unexpectedly to say goodbye to my Grandpa one last time before he passed away. We had many big races, I got a writing gig with Primal Eye (which takes up precious time on the weekend), and I experienced too much emotional stress from my teaching job culminating in me changing jobs at the end of October. We also travelled much over 2015, which is great and so rewarding, but can also be stressful. To sum it up, 2015 took its toll on me with many emotional ups and downs and self-imposed pressure. And to help me work on it, work through it, and  deal with it, I did what I do best: I wrote about it.

Continue reading

Me + Eczema: a brief history

* disclaimer: I am not a medical professional. The advice I write below is based on my experience of someone that lives with eczema, and what remedies work for me.

Throughout my life, on and off, I’ve dealt with eczema. It is a skin condition that consists of patches anywhere on the body, where any of the following can occur: swelling, redness, small bumps, itchiness, cracking, seeping, peeling, dryness and flakiness. For anyone that has dealt with it, this is basically the course in which a flare up ensues. And, like me, you might’ve woken up in the middle of the night, scratching the affected area.

20160418_174525 (3)

Continue reading

Here: In races, minimalist shoes, health… life

Teacher: Danielle?

Me: Here!

As a teacher I can’t help use this comparison to describe me at the moment. I am here, although I haven’t been here on this blog for a bit. Life has gotten in the way: many deadlines for the magazine that have now passed, lots of time with friends and family, work is easing off and we’re nearing our next holiday; now I finally feel I have the energy, motivation and space in my head to compose a blog post.

A lot has happened since I last touched down here.

Work has gotten so much better. I don’t feel I’m missing out anymore and I feel far more settled. I really enjoy my job and working with primary children again, but part of me will always love working with teenagers.

I ran a few races this year but didn’t do any recaps. Truth be told, I find recaps a chore to write, and feel there’s only a certain window of time afterwards where it’s acceptable to write about a race. Weeks and months later aren’t acceptable to me. In January, my running club had four teams entered in the Devil’s Burden relay race, a 4-leg off-road race of trail running, fell running and navigation. Some legs required two people to run them because there was much navigation required. My leg was all fell running: up a steep, big hill without a designated trail, and back down the other side. It was 5 km and a 900+ foot climb. You get the idea.

IMG_20160123_171944 (2)

I ran up that… and by ‘ran’ I mean walked. I walked up that. Quickly.

Continue reading

9 Ways to Relieve Stress

Did you know April is Stress Awareness month? Stress is seems like an aspect of adult life that just gets shrugged off. We all experience it, we all have our own ways of dealing with it. The problem is, some of these ways are more destructive than constructive.

source

Stress can result in many health annoyances: weight gain, sleep loss, decreased immunity, digestive issues, even injury in the physically active. We also know that it affects us emotionally and psychologically, and inhibits our ability to think clearly and handle issues effectively. Over time, all of this chronic stress does a lot more to us than we realise: it is a contributing factor – along with diet, genetics, sleep and physical activity – to many lifestyle-related diseases. Continue reading

{Coconut Friends} Alicia in Berlin

Coconut Friends is a monthly series I’ve started to showcase people’s journeys and success using a variation of primal eating. Primal eating affects us all in different ways, and the reasons we start doing it varies as well.

This month’s Coconut Friend is my real-life good friend Alicia. Maybe you’ll remember that her and her boyfriend André (now fiancé) visited Pat and I this past April? Alicia and I met while we were both at the University of Alberta, through my roommate at the time. We’ve skied all over the Rockies together, bonded over being teachers and Sex in the City among other things, and traveled to Europe together in 2008. Alicia is one of my closest friends, lives in my favourite city in the world, and was the one who first put the paleo bug in my ear. She also taught me how to make her delicious banana pancakes!

IMG_804961704780578

Our ski days in the Rockies

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

Spring of 2013 was a time not only for seasonal changes, but for life changes as well. I had signed a contract to teach in a bilingual school and move from Edmonton, the city I had lived in my whole life, to one of the most exciting capitals in the world: Berlin, Germany.

Leading up to my life change, I had been dealing with a lot of fatigue and intestinal and stomach issues, and would often complain of having a food baby after I ate a meal. I thought that I ate healthy: oatmeal with fruit for breakfast, soup, salads, leftovers for lunch. Dinners would vary as I would often eat the same thing for a few days straight, and was cooking for one. I would eat salads as well with some sort of meat (sometimes, not because of being a vegetarian but because it seemed like a lot of work). Quinoa replaced rice as a side and I would also add veggies to it and eat it as a cold salad. Meat, cheese, olives and bread were also a nice weekend treat with wine. I didn’t eat too much junk food but when I did, pretzels were my choice because they were lower in fat than chips and it made me feel good about my salty snack. Despite eating veggies, and eating ‘healthy’, I still had weird stomach problems.

Continue reading

{Primal Lessons} The philosophies behind primal eating

The purpose of the series is to educate people on every aspect of primal eating and living. It’s also intended as further education for those interested in making changes to their current diet: I truly think a major reason why so many people have been successful with primal eating is because they’ve done their research and understand how it works, inside and out. It’s not simply about what to eat and what not to eat; it’s about understanding how our body reacts to different foods and what to do about it. If you’re considering dabbling in ancestral eating, or simply feel like when I use certain terms on this blog you haven’t a clue what I’m talking about, this series is for you. It will cover everything.The purpose of this is to inform, and clear up any misconceptions people may have regarding this facet of low-carb eating. Disclaimer: I’m not a registered dietician, I’m just someone who has done their research and successfully implemented a primal way of eating, and has seen major benefits. I do, however, plan to certify in the next year.

Today’s lesson is on the philosophies behind primal eating Screenshot_2014-09-07-09-12-42-1 Continue reading

{Primal lessons} The science behind primal eating

The purpose of the series is to educate people on every aspect of primal eating and living. It’s also intended as further education for those interested in making changes to their current diet: I truly think a major reason why so many people have been successful with primal eating is because they’ve done their research and understand how it works, inside and out. It’s not simply about what to eat and what not to eat; it’s about understanding how our body reacts to different foods and what to do about it.

If you’re considering dabbling in ancestral eating, or simply feel like when I use certain terms on this blog you haven’t a clue what I’m talking about, this series is for you. It will cover everything.The purpose of this is to inform, and clear up any misconceptions people may have regarding this facet of low-carb eating.

Disclaimer: I’m not a registered dietician, I’m just someone who has done their research and successfully implemented a primal way of eating, and has seen major benefits. I do, however, plan to certify in the next year.

Today’s lesson is on the science behind primal eating

Primal eating from a scientific point of view is essentially about eating low-glycemic foods in order to keep our blood glucose levels (aka blood sugar) stable, which allows our metabolism to function properly. Metabolism refers to

the set of life-sustaining chemical transformations within the cells of living organisms, and to all chemical reactions that occur in living organisms, including digestion and the transport of substances into and between different cells… (source).

That last bit is very important as our cells, and how they function, are a key player in weight gain and loss. Let me explain.

Continue reading